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My latest publication is the study protocol for our randomised controlled non-inferiority trial comparing internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) with face-to-face CBT for adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We describe how we will do the first direct comparison between ICBT and face-to-face CBT for OCD, something that has not been done before. One improvement from previous trials is that we include both self-referred patients and clinically-referred patients, making sure that we have a “real world” sample of participants.

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Obsessions and compulsions are the hallmarks of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In the dominating cognitive model, compulsions are voluntary actions performed to reduce the likelihood that an unwanted, or feared, consequence will take place. Neuroscientists are now challenging this view with a competing explanation where obsessions arise from compulsions, not the other way around. Efficient habits and flexible goals What are the forces driving our behaviour? Habits and goal-directed behaviour compete for control over how you behave.

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Academic work involves a ton of writing, so I figured that an investment in the writing process should be worthwhile. I’ve just finished an online course called Writing in the Sciences with Kristin Sainani of Stanford, which had solid advice for all stages of writing. I highly recommend the course to anyone that wants to learn about academic writing or needs a reminder of good writing habits. Here I’ll summarise the writing process.

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Hoarding Disorder is an obsessive-compulsive related disorder characterized by a difficulty to discard possessions. This makes the home cluttered and dangerous to live in. Hoarding disorder is also very hard to treat, which is why I’m excited to tell you about a new study from our lab! We just published an article describing a group CBT treatment with between-sessions internet-based support for Hoarding Disorder in the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

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Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that usually develops before the age of 25. With such an early onset, the link between OCD and educational outcomes is important to study in order to understand the full impact of OCD. My colleagues just publised a study in JAMA Psychiatry where they investigated the link between obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and educational achievement in a nationwide study. Main findings They found that OCD is associated with a lower probability of entering and completing all levels of education, from compulsory school up until university degrees.

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Anxiety disorders are common mental health disorders that affect about 4 % of adults at any one time.1 In addition, anxiety disorders are the sixth leading cause of disability worldwide (depression is second on the list).2 The authors of these global studies on disease burden conclude: ”Anxiety disorders are chronic, highly prevalent, disabling conditions with onset usually in children and young people. Treatment rates are low despite the personal suffering and economic impact arising from these disorders (Kessler & Greenberg, 2002).

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I recently read an article in BMC Psychiatry1 where researchers estimated that, in Sweden, 70 % of individuals with OCD are only seen in primary care. Only 30 % are referred to a specialized unit where there is a chance to receive evidence-based CBT-treatment! Primary care units (vårdcentraler) have limited resources and are unable to provide CBT-treatment to most sufferers of OCD. If only there was a rigorously evaluated, easily scalable, CBT-treatment that was cost-effective enough to be a first-line treatment for OCD?

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An article I co-authored was just published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The project was led by Dr. Nora Choque-Olsson and Professor Sven Bölte at the Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at KI. In the study, children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder received a training programme to improve social skills. About 1 % of children and adolescents have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in high income countries.

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OCD stands for obsessive-compulsive disorder. People with OCD are plagued by obsessions (negative thoughts, images, or impulses). They perform compulsions to reduce the distress caused by obsessions. The purpose of this post is to give a brief overview of OCD and it’s components: obsessions and compulsions. While every patient has a unique history and display of symptoms, there are characteristics that distinguish OCD from other mental health problems. Let’s have a look at a case taken from the web 1.

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In a few months I will be a psychologist working with mental health. That seems pretty far from genes in cells, right? It turns out genes are profoundly important to our mental health and the purpose of this post is to give an overview of the topic. The relationship between genes and mental illness is complex. Researchers call the relationship non-deterministic and subtle. Genes do not tell us exactly who will have a certain disorder and who will not.

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